Completed: Lady Skater dress with drape neckline

140411_front viewThis dress nearly defeated me but I am glad I persevered. I thought it would be fun to change the scoop neckline on the Lady Skater dress to a drape neckline to create a different look . I worry that if I make the same pattern over and over with the only change being the fabric that is used they’ll be too much alike. Changing details like necklines and sleeve lengths seems a good solution to this problem and they’re also fun as it often involves some pattern drafting.

140411_drape neckline2So, creating a drape neckline, “how hard can it be”? I had made drape necklines before on t-shirts for one of my sisters. A smarter person than me would have studied that pattern extensively before she started drafting, and more importantly, cutting the fabric. Let’s just say my first version wasn’t even remotely drapey and looked more like a boat neck trying to strangle me.

Luckily I had enough fabric left to cut a new front bodice. This one worked much better! I think I could have added even more drape but was worried at first that it might be too revealing. I shouldn’t have cut it out of fabric immediately though because I didn’t really consider the effect that my changes to the pattern had on the shape of the waistline. My waistline looked like this after cutting it from fabric (and that was the last piece of fabric large enough to accommodate the front bodice):

This is what happens when you forget to true up your waistline...

This is what happens when you forget to true up your pattern…

Whoops, not sure how that is going to look when the skirt is attached… I wasn’t certain how to fix this, so decided to leave this problem for after I completed sewing the bodice. I needn’t have worried though because this fabric has more lengthwise stretch than the fabric I used previously and as a result the waistline ended up far too low for my taste. I chopped an inch off the front and back bodice and in the process got rid of the sweetheart waistline detail.

Before reattaching the skirt I also took in the side seams. The before pictures below are how the dress was when I posted last time. I didn’t really like the dress then and wasn’t sure how to fix it.

140411_beforeafter

I thought something was missing, but I was wrong, there was still too much of something. Fabric, to be precise. I took the dress in at the back waist and removed even more at both side seams from just below the bust to the skirt hem and am now much happier with how it looks. It was a subtle change but I think it makes enough of a difference, especially from the front.

140411_side viewI can imagine some of you might be interested in how I converted the scoop neck to a drape neck. In the picture below I highlighted the orginal front bodice pattern piece in green. Starting at the centre front waistline you draw a straigth line (1) that flares out towards the neckline and extends beyond the original pattern piece (this will be the new center front).  More flare means more drape. Then you fold the pattern perpendicular to line 1 so that the corner of the shoulderseam ends up on the foldline. Then trace the shoulderseam  and the armhole onto the piece that is folded over, this is how you create the facing for the drape. Unfold the pattern and draw a second line (2) perpendicular to line line 1 so that the traced part of the armhole measures around 7.5 cm (I think it will still work if it is a little less or a little bit more).  I also added a notch in the armhole where the facing ends up when it is folded over. If you don’t want to end up with a strange looking waistline you also true up the pattern there.

front bodice pattern with drape neckline

I am apparently able to draft patterns in the future…

I finished my back bodice with a neckband, there are other options, but the important thing to keep in mind is that the length of the finished back bodice shoulder seam should be the same as the front bodice shoulder seam, so depending on your choice of finish you may have to make some changes to the back bodice as well. I reinforced the shoulder seam on the back bodice with some stay tape (not visible in the pictures). The shoulder seam is sewn by laying down the front and back bodice pieces right sides together with the shoulder seams matching. The facing of the front bodice is then folded over the back bodice so that the shoulder seam on the facing matches up as well (see picture below). I highly recommend basting this seam first to check how it looks from the right side. It can be tricky to get the back and front neckline to match up exactly, in the picture on the right you can see that I didn’t manage to do so completely, but trust me, it can be a lot worse. I basted the facing to the armhole before continuing to prevent shifting during the attachment of the armhole.

140411_shoulderseam

For now I am done playing with the Lady Skater pattern. My next make will be something I have never made before but that will be used on a daily basis. Can you guess what it will be?

Back view

Sometimes you need to step back from your work and do something else

Unfinished Lady Skater dressI am working on my next Lady Skater dress. It only needs hemming before it’s finished but I’m feeling a little meh about it. Something is missing and I’m not entirely sure what. I could of course sew the hems and be done with it, but how likely is it that I’m going to wear a dress I feel meh about? I’ve decided to give it a rest for a couple of days before I try it on again to see how I feel then. If the feeling is still meh I’ll experiment a bit with skirt lengths, sleeve lengths, belts and waist ties to see if that will make me like it better.

Until I continue with the dress I still want to do some sewing but not start anything big. I made some fabric postcards using the method from my tutorial. I remembered a comment from katechiconi on my post about gift making. She suggested creating 4 placemats in one go, by first quilting a large piece of fabric that is later cut into separate pieces for the placemats. That would work equally well for making multiple postcards from the same fabric if larger pieces of the front and back fabric are interfaced before cutting the postcards to size. From the length of a fat quarter (± 45 cm, 18’’) you can easily cut 4 postcards that are 10×15 cm (4’’x 6’’). Conveniently, the roll of Vlieseline s520 that I am currently using is 45 cm wide, so that was just meant to be! The smaller piece that was left after cutting the 4 postcards was turned into a bookmark, because I don’t see why you can’t have a pretty fabric bookmark.

Cutting 4 postcards and a bookmark in one go.

Cutting 4 postcards and a bookmark in one go.

These postcards were almost instant gratification because they were fast to make and are so bright and happy. They would have been even faster if I hadn’t thought it fun to change the thread colour for the zigzag stitches around the edges for each postcard.

Do you sometimes take a break from a project when you are unsure how to continue? How do get yourself to go back to finishing it? I am worried the dress will turn into an UFO if I don’t solve my issues of not really liking it soon.

140407_postcards

Completed: Improvisationally pieced t-shirt

Improvisationally pieced t-shirt

To make a long story (not even that) short, this t-shirt is an excellent example of what happens when I:

  • Decide to use a 65cm long, 1.5m wide piece of fabric to make a ¾ or long sleeved t-shirt. People, this doesn’t fit unless you are a child or possibly when you wore a size XS pre vanity sizing. Why I didn’t simply make a short sleeved t-shirt with this fabric? I’m not sure.
  • Leave the left-over fabric of my previous t-shirt in the vicinity of my cutting mat after completing said t-shirt.
  • Decide to make ¾ length sleeves because that length could be cut out of the striped fabric.
  • Don’t want a sleeve that is just stripes because that might look weird.
  • Think it would be cool to have a strip of stripes down the length of one of the sleeves, preferably the left (guess where it ended up…)
  • Piece a strip of striped fabric in between 2 pieces of purple fabric to create a new piece of fabric to cut out the second sleeve.
  • Pieced sleeveRealise I must have made a calculation mistake because the new piece of fabric that I created is too narrow after a certain point to cut out the sleeve (the purple fabric was slightly weirdly shaped at the sides due to other pattern pieces having been cut around it).
  • Decide to make short sleeves instead.
  • After cutting the sleeve realise I still have some purple fabric left that is wide enough to be added at the bottom of the sleeve!
  • Realise it is too short to convert the short sleeve to a ¾ length sleeve.
  • Wish I hadn’t already cut the short sleeve.
  • Attach the piece of purple fabric anyway.
  • Attach more stripes at the bottom of the sleeve to make it ¾ length.
  • Start construction of the t-shirt.
  • Use the striped fabric for the neckband so the stripes on the sleeve won’t feel lonely.
  • Put it on and feel relieved it’s wearable.

What do you think? Is improvisational piecing going to be the next big thing or should I instead make sure to buy enough fabric for future projects?

t-shirt front

 

Completed: Lady Skater t-shirt

Lady Skater t-shirt frontI could do with some new t-shirts to replace some old and worn ones and since I am very happy with the fit of the Lady Skater dress I decided to turn the bodice into a t-shirt pattern.

The shoulder seam tends to shift backwards when I wear my Lady Skater dress so I moved it forward on my t-shirt pattern and I think that this is an improvement as it now stays in place. This is an adjustment that I need to do more often so I am a bit surprised I missed it earlier.

The bodice of the dress finishes around the waist so I needed to extend it to t-shirt length. To do this I used the t-shirt pattern from the Craftsy Sewing with knits class. At first I simply overlapped the two patterns matching at center front or center back and the armpit (more or less, obviously they didn’t match completely at the latter). I then simply merged the side seams of the two patterns, making sure that they would be the same length on the front and back pattern pieces. In the end I ended up taking the t-shirt in quite a bit because I wanted it to be more fitted than the sewing with knits pattern was.

WLady Skater t-shirt sidehen trying it on I found the hem too long but I think I was a bit too enthusiastic when I chopped the excess length off. My next t-shirt will be longer.

Overall I am happy with the fit and the matching of the stripes turned out pretty good as well. The seams were sewn with my overlocker but because I was working with a stripe I first machine basted the seams that needed pattern matching to ensure a good match. This did make the process longer since I essentially had to do those seams twice but unpicking overlock stitches to fix shifted stripes would have taken even longer.

Lady Skater backI was very lucky to find this fabric at a fabric market last week. I was looking for stripes but most of them were the wrong colour or very narrow. I had almost given up hope on finding a suitable one when I spotted this fabric hidden at the bottom of a huge pile. I quickly realised it is exactly the same type of fabric as a grey/purple stripe I bought a couple of years ago that is very comfortable to wear. Unfortunately, the vendor only had 1.2 m left on the bolt and only this colour combination. Otherwise I would certainly have bought more! I don’t wear a lot of bold prints but I do love a good stripe.

I see many more t-shirts in my near future. In fact, I’ve already started cutting out another one. I also want to play a bit with different necklines to add variety.

Lady Skater t-shirt

Tutorial: How to construct a zipper pocket

Ali asked if I could do a tutorial on how I constructed the zipper pocket in the lining of my It’s all about the zippers bag and here it is!

I incorporate this type of pocket in nearly every bag I make nowadays. It can be used on the outside and in the lining. It is constructed by first creating a window in the fabric behind which the zipper is placed.

You might think that this pocket is only suitable for bag making but you are wrong there! I’ve seen this type of pocket a lot on RTW trousers lately, for example, this pair from Michael Kors has 6 of these pockets! When these pockets are used in RTW trousers they’re usually not very functional because the pocket lining is very small, it is added more as a design feature.

examples of zipper pockets in RTW coatsIt is also often used in coats and jackets.  Just take a look at the coats in your household and I’m pretty sure you’ll find a pocket or two that was constructed using this technique. I’ve taken pictures of some that I found in our coats. Sometimes they have an additional flap that covers the zipper. I think this is a nice detail so as a bonus I am also going to show you how to add two types of flaps to your pocket.

Materials:

zipperpocket_materials

  1. Fabric to add the zipper pocket to
  2. Fabric for the lining of the pocket
  3. Fusible interfacing
  4. Zipper
  5. Double sided tape (I use Prym wonder tape)
  6. Pins
  7. Handbasting thread
  8. Sewing machine thread
  9. Regular zipper foot (I accidently put my invisible zipper foot in the picture)
  10. Scissors
  11. Fabric marker
  12. Ruler

This type of pocket has to be added to the pattern piece before construction of the bag or garment. So if you decide to add one to the lining of a bag you first make this pocket in the lining piece before you start assembly of the lining.

I am using contrasting fabrics and thread in this tutorial for the purpose of clarity but I do recommend that you use matching thread and fabrics.

Standard zipper pocket

Dashed line indicates pocket lining.

Dashed line indicates pocket lining.

Step 1: Determine the size of your pocket. This has several aspects. The length of the zipper window and the dimensions of the pocket lining.

For a bag I prefer the pocket lining to extend at least 5 cm (2’’) from both sides and the top of the zipper window (this already includes seam allowances). This ensures easy access into the pocket but if you don’t have enough room to add this amount it will usually still work if you add less. I also make sure that the lining of the pocket is smaller than the outer fabric so that it doesn’t get caught in any seam allowances when the bag is assembled (for coat linings one of the sides is usually attached to the front facing though). I let the depth of the pocket depend on what I want to use the pocket for but I don’t want the bottom of the pocket to reach the bottom of the bag.

I made a small sample for this tutorial and decided on a 9 cm (±3 1/2”)  long window. The lining pieces for this sample were 19 cm (length) x 15 cm (height) (± 7 1/2” x 6”).

Step 2: You will need 2 pieces of lining fabric. Cut both the size you decided on in the previous step. I recommend that one matches either the zipper or outer fabric colour because a small sliver of it will be visible from the outside. The other piece can be a fun print or contrasting colour. If you want to use the same fabric for both pocket lining pieces you can also cut one piece that is twice as long and fold it back up on itself to create the pocket lining.

When I add this type of pocket in a bag lining I will usually also use the lining fabric for one of the pocket lining pieces. When added to the outside of the bag (sturdier fabric) I try to find a piece of e.g. quilting cotton that is a close match in colour because it can become a bit bulky otherwise.

Step 3

Step 3

Step 3: Add some fusible interfacing to the wrong side of the pattern piece you want to add the zipper pocket to. It should be placed so that the zipper window will end up more or less in the centre of the interfacing. This will add a bit of extra stability, a lightweight interfacing will do fine; you don’t want to add a lot of extra bulk. I cut my piece 15 x 4 cm (6” x ±1 1/2”) When I add this pocket to a bag exterior I’ve usually already interfaced the whole piece, in that case I don’t add any extra interfacing.

Step 4: Pin one of the lining pieces (the one that matches the outer fabric) right sides together to the main fabric. The fabric should be placed exactly how you want it to end up on the back.

Step 5: Draw the desired window opening on the lining piece using the ruler and fabric marker. For most zippers a 1 cm (3/8’’) wide opening works well. I drew my box 9 x 1 cm (±3 1/2” x 3/8”). Draw another line in the box that is in between the two long lines and makes a V-shape to the two corners starting ± 1 cm (3/8’’) from the side.

Step 6: Stitch around the box that you just drew, backstitch to secure. If your machine has a needle down function it can be useful for this step because you have to pivot in the corners.

zipper pocket window

Step 4, 5 & 6

Step 7: Use scissors or a seam ripper to make a small hole on the line inside the box. Cut the box open on this line and cut into the corners in the V-shape. Cut as close to the stitching as possible but be careful not to cut the stitches.

Zipper pocket construction

Step 7

Step 8: Fold the lining fabric through the hole you just cut and use your iron to press the lining neatly to the back. You want to see as little of the lining fabric on the front of the window as possible but it is a bit inevitable that some of it will remain visible.

Step 8

Step 8

Step 9: Sew the zipper ends together at the zipper pull side. You don’t have to pull the zipper tapes very close together because that can distort the shape of the zipper a bit. I find that doing this step makes it easier later on to sew the zipper in place.

If your zipper is a lot longer than you really need for the pocket it is usually a good idea to shorten it. You do this by first creating a new zipper stop by sewing over the zipper teeth as shown in the picture and then cutting off the excess. You really want to do it in this order because if you first cut and then decide to test the zipper before you have sewn the new zipper stop you will end up with two separate pieces that you have no way to put back together into a functional zip. I don’t think you need to ask me how I know…

Step 9

Step 9

Step 10: Position the zipper behind the window. There are at least 3 different methods to do this 1. Pin the zipper in place. 2. First pin in place, hand baste in place and then remove pins. 3. Use double sided tape to stick the zipper to the fabric. The last method is my favourite because it is fast and ensures that the zipper stays nicely in place when sewing. Pinning is my least favourite method because the pins can get in the way when sewing and the zipper can more easily shift during sewing when you remove the pins.

zipper pocket

Step 10

Step 11: Use your regular zipper foot to topstitch around the zipper window to sew the zipper in place. Unless you are really confident that your topstitching is absolutely spot on I recommend to use a matching thread. If you have a needle down option on your machine it is really helpful to use it for this step because you have to pivot in the corners. When the zipper pull gets in the way carefully unzip the zipper with the needle in the fabric.

zipper pocket

Step 11

Step 12: Pin the other piece of lining fabric to the piece that is already sewn to the window. I like to use a contrasting colour or a print for this piece because it gives a nice surprise when the pocket is opened.

Step 13: Sew around the two lining pieces with a 1 cm (3/8’’) seam allowance. Make sure not to catch any of the outer fabric into your stitching. For an extra sturdy pocket you can finish the edges of the seam allowance with a zigzag stitch or use an overlock stitch.

Step 12 & 13

Step 12 & 13

You are done and have successfully made a zipper pocket! Continue assembly of the bag or garment.

zipper pocket9

Zipper pocket flap variations

Now I will show you 2 variations on the zipper pocket. In the first variation a flap is incorporated that covers the whole zipper so that you can’t see the zipper from the outside until you lift up the flap. In the second variation two smaller flaps are sewn right next to the zipper teeth. These cover the zipper tape and can add a nice touch of colour to your pocket.

For both variations you will first follow steps 1-9 of the standard zipper pocket tutorial to create the window and prepare the zipper.

Single flap that covers the zipper

Step a: Cut a piece of fabric for the flap. My window was 10 cm (4”) long and I cut the piece 12 cm (±4 3/4”) long and 5 cm (2”) wide.

Step b: Fold the piece of fabric in half lengthwise and press.

Step c: Use a zigzag or overlock stitch to finish the 3 raw edges.

Step a, b & c

Step a, b & c

Step d: Position the flap behind the zipper window. The fold should touch the lower edge of the window. I first pin and then hand baste. It is important that the handbasting stitches don’t get too close to the edge of the window because you don’t want to topstitch over them.

Step d. Note that I made a sample for this tutorial and used a scrap for the pocket lining piece. For a real pocket I would have used a larger piece of lining fabric.

Step e: Position the zipper behind the flap. The zipper teeth should end up in the centre of the zipper window. I again prefer to use double side tape but you could also pin or hand baste.

zipper pocket12

Step e

Continue with step 11 of the standard zipper pocket tutorial to complete the pocket.

Flap that covers zipper opening

Completed zipper pocket with flap.

Zipper pocket with two flaps that cover the zipper tape

Step I: Cut two pieces of fabric for the flaps. For my 10 cm (4”)  long zipper window I cut them 13 cm (5 1/8”) x 2 cm (3/4”). I chose a width that was 2x the width of the zipper tape.

Step II: Fold the pieces in half lenghtwise and press. You could finish the raw edges with a narrow zigzag or overlock stitch (you don’t want these stitches to be visible in the window) but it is not really necessary.

zipper pocket with flaps

Step I & II

Step III: Place the folds of the flaps right next to the zipper teeth and pin in place.

Step IV: Sew the flaps to the zipper tape, stay quite close to the edge of the zipper tape because you don’t want these stitches to show up in the window.

Zipper pocket

Step III & IV

Step V: Position the zipper behind the zipper pocket. I used double sided tape but you could also pin or handbaste. You want the zipper teeth to end up in the centre of the window.

zipper pocket

Step V

Continue with step 11 of the standard zipper pocket tutorial to complete the pocket.

zipper pocket

Completed zipper pocket with 2 flaps.

Do you think you will give this type of pocket a try in one of your next projects? Which of the 3 variations that I showed is your favourite?

Completed: Self-drafted A-line skirt with button front placket

A-line skirt close upAfter my first self-drafted A-line skirt was such a success I simply had to make another one. I used the same basic pattern and adapted it so that it features a waistband, button front placket and inset pockets. It results in a very different look. I am really enjoying this pattern drafting business and am already dreaming about yet another version that may or may not include a lined vent.

This skirt was inspired by the Colette Beignet and Megan Nielsen’s Kelly skirt. Instead of spending money on a pattern and a lot of time getting it to fit right it seemed much easier and faster to draft my own and it was.

skirt buttonsI used a denim fabric with some stretch that I can only describe as looking splotched with bleach. The pattern placement looked rather random so I did not attempt any pattern matching and I think it turned out fine (May and Patrick might disagree though). The buttons are from my stash and I think they are a perfect match for this fabric. The waistband closes with a hook. I sometimes struggle to get my buttonhole foot to behave on parts that are a bit more bulky and I didn’t feel like doing that yesterday.

skirt pocketI made the pockets a bit deeper on this skirt than on my previous version and I think this is an improvement. The opening of the pockets is finished with my coverstitch machine as was the hem. I just love those neat rows of double stitching.

For the finish of the waistband facing on the inside I tried something new. In some of my RTW jeans the bottom edge of the waistband facing is  finished with bias tape and I really like that detail. It is a neat finish and because the seam allowance isn’t folded to the inside of the waistband to hide it, it is far less bulky than what I used to do. It made topstitching the waistband a breeze. It also adds a fun touch of colour that only the wearer of the garment will see.

waistband biastape finishI am probably not the only one that loves to have a look inside other people’s garments:

Self-drafted A-line skirtFor those of you that would like to add a button front placket to an existing skirt pattern I’ve made a schematic that shows how I changed my pattern. The important things when drafting are how wide you want the waistband to be and how much overlap you want between the front skirt pieces. For a 4 cm overlap you first measure 2 cm (so half the measurement of the final overlap) from the center front and then add another 4 cm for the facing. I interfaced the facing before folding it to the inside. Don’t forget to add seam allowances to the top of the skirt and the bottom and center front of the waistband after cutting the pattern in two when you are working with a pattern that has the seam allowance already included in each pattern piece.

How to add button front placket to A-line skirt pattern

Giveaway winner

Then finally, we also have a winner for the Sunnyside quiltfabric giveaway! My boyfriend was so kind to draw a winner on Wednesday night and I took some photographic evidence:

Sunnyside_giveawaywinnerI’ve already contacted Selma and I hope she will enjoy making her first quilt!

self-drafted A-line skirt

Completed: Sunnyside baby quilt & giveaway

I finished my first quilt of 2014. It was made for the newborn son of one of my friends. She’s the first of my high school and university friends to have a baby so it was a very special occasion.

Sunnyside quilt frontI used Kate Spain’s Sunnyside collection for Moda. This fabric makes me happy (even though there are clouds and raindrops featured on some of the fabrics!) and I think it’s perfect for a baby quilt so I bought a fat quarter bundle. Note to future self: When you want to use a whole fabric collection to make one baby quilt, it might be better to get a layer cake instead since a fat quarter bundle featuring 40 fabrics amounts to 10 yards of fabric which is enough to make at least 4 quilt tops…  Just saying…

The finished quilt measures 35’’ x 47 ¼’’ (90 x 120 cm). I wanted this to be a relatively quick make and didn’t want to do any seam matching while piecing. For the front I cut 6.5’’ x 8.5’’ rectangles that were assembled in alternating columns of 5 or 6 pieces. The top and bottom of the columns with 5 pieces were filled up with 6.5’’ x 4.5’’ rectangles.

floral fabrics SunnysideI didn’t use all of the fabrics in the collection. There are a couple that are a bit on the floral side that I think are too girly for a boy’s quilt. I tried to include the two blue fabrics on the bottom row in the picture but on their own they looked out of place so I decided to duplicate some of the other fabrics instead.

At first I wasn’t sure what to do with the back. I considered using a solid with some blocks of the Sunnyside collection pieced in. The problem with this idea was that I didn’t have enough of a solid fabric in my stash that really works with this collection and there are no quilt shops in Leiden so buying something new would either mean going to another city or buy online. The risk of the latter being that the colour I pick might not work with the collection after all when I get it. Since I had a lot of fabric left over from making the top I simply cut 6’’ strips of varying length and assembled these in rows.

Sunnyside quilt backFor the quilting I wanted to stay in theme with the fabric and did a huge sun with sunrays in an orange variegated thread using my walking foot. The rays turned out pretty straight but the sun is a bit wobbly/wonky in some of the circles. I probably wanted to go too fast. In the centre of the sun I quilted the boy’s initial, I like this detail.

Sunnyside quiltFor the binding I had the same issue of not knowing which solid would work well. I realised that the fabrics that I could be certain would work were the ones that were already in the quilt. I searched Dutch online fabric stores and could find only 1 fabric from this collection for sale in the whole of the Netherlands and that’s the one I ended up using. The binding was handsewn to the quilt and I think this process took longer than the piecing of the front and back of the quilt. I love the look of a handsewn binding so I suppose it’s worth the time and effort.

Sunnyside quilt handsewn binding

Giveaway has closed!

Unsurprisingly, I still have quite a bit of fabric left over from my fat quarter bundle so I thought it would be fun to share some of it with one of my lovely readers. I cut pieces that measure at least 6’’x12’’ of each fabric from the collection.  Most are more generous. This is enough fabric to create a decent sized quilt top. I leave it up to the winner to cut it up into squares, rectangles, triangles, hexagons or whatever else takes their fancy.

Sunnyside giveaway

This could be yours!

Rules:

  • Giveaway is open internationally.
  • To enter leave a comment that clearly states that you wish to enter the giveaway. If you just comment “hey, I like your quilt” I will assume you are not interested in the fabric.
  • You can enter until Wednesday March 5th, 20.00h UTC +1.
  • Only 1 entry per person.
  • Friends and family are allowed to enter.
  • Prize drawing will be performed by my boyfriend.
  • Results are incontestable

140301_Sunnysidequilt_folded