Completed: Self-drafted A-line skirt with button front placket

A-line skirt close upAfter my first self-drafted A-line skirt was such a success I simply had to make another one. I used the same basic pattern and adapted it so that it features a waistband, button front placket and inset pockets. It results in a very different look. I am really enjoying this pattern drafting business and am already dreaming about yet another version that may or may not include a lined vent.

This skirt was inspired by the Colette Beignet and Megan Nielsen’s Kelly skirt. Instead of spending money on a pattern and a lot of time getting it to fit right it seemed much easier and faster to draft my own and it was.

skirt buttonsI used a denim fabric with some stretch that I can only describe as looking splotched with bleach. The pattern placement looked rather random so I did not attempt any pattern matching and I think it turned out fine (May and Patrick might disagree though). The buttons are from my stash and I think they are a perfect match for this fabric. The waistband closes with a hook. I sometimes struggle to get my buttonhole foot to behave on parts that are a bit more bulky and I didn’t feel like doing that yesterday.

skirt pocketI made the pockets a bit deeper on this skirt than on my previous version and I think this is an improvement. The opening of the pockets is finished with my coverstitch machine as was the hem. I just love those neat rows of double stitching.

For the finish of the waistband facing on the inside I tried something new. In some of my RTW jeans the bottom edge of the waistband facing is  finished with bias tape and I really like that detail. It is a neat finish and because the seam allowance isn’t folded to the inside of the waistband to hide it, it is far less bulky than what I used to do. It made topstitching the waistband a breeze. It also adds a fun touch of colour that only the wearer of the garment will see.

waistband biastape finishI am probably not the only one that loves to have a look inside other people’s garments:

Self-drafted A-line skirtFor those of you that would like to add a button front placket to an existing skirt pattern I’ve made a schematic that shows how I changed my pattern. The important things when drafting are how wide you want the waistband to be and how much overlap you want between the front skirt pieces. For a 4 cm overlap you first measure 2 cm (so half the measurement of the final overlap) from the center front and then add another 4 cm for the facing. I interfaced the facing before folding it to the inside. Don’t forget to add seam allowances to the top of the skirt and the bottom and center front of the waistband after cutting the pattern in two when you are working with a pattern that has the seam allowance already included in each pattern piece.

How to add button front placket to A-line skirt pattern

Giveaway winner

Then finally, we also have a winner for the Sunnyside quiltfabric giveaway! My boyfriend was so kind to draw a winner on Wednesday night and I took some photographic evidence:

Sunnyside_giveawaywinnerI’ve already contacted Selma and I hope she will enjoy making her first quilt!

self-drafted A-line skirt

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20 comments on “Completed: Self-drafted A-line skirt with button front placket

  1. Annette says:

    I love your skirt. I had a similar designs, but it was Ready to Wear. I love to draft straight and A-line skirts. It seems to take almost as long to make as cutting out and adjusting a purchased skirt.

  2. onedabbles says:

    Great skirt – fits and suits you so well and the finishing inside is so neat. Essence of May and Patrick is definitely in the air at the moment ; )

  3. Emma Jayne says:

    Great skirt and the colourful finish on the inside waistband is so fun! Thanks for linking the lined vent sew along too.

    • Emmely says:

      Thank you! I think I’ll include the lined vent on my next skirt (am waiting until all the post are up because I want to know all the steps before I start sewing) and I thought this was a nice way to direct other skirt sewing people to the sew along.

  4. I made it!! says:

    I love the pattern and I love the fabric. You made it such a good fit!

  5. Amanda says:

    Looks great inside and out! I like the waistband inside! Great idea….now May and Patrick WOULD like that! Lol

  6. Selma says:

    Me happy!! I never win anything, this is a very good first!
    I love the fabric of the skirt to.
    And you’re definitely not the only one wanting to look inside other people’s garments. Sometimes my hands itch to undress people, but somehow that seems a bit indecent most of the time.
    I was a bit flustered about who Patrick and May are. But then it hit me! How could I forget? Especially since I so much agree with with Lynda’s hand-sign for him. For those still flustered; keep the telly tuned on BBC Two at Tuesdays 20:00 GMT. You’ll love it!

    • Emmely says:

      I sometimes catch myself staring at interesting seamlines on other people’s clothes and always hope they didn’t notice.
      I think a lot of people turn on the BBC on Tuesdays these weeks, so much fun.

  7. I love the skirt! It’s a very fun fabric as well. Thank you for sharing the bias tape on waistband idea. It does look very neat. x

  8. […] when I was through – pretty neat if I do say so myself! I also had lots of guidance using this very helpful tutorial. My only mistake was trusting the pattern measurements instead of making a muslin and test fitting […]

  9. […] The Libby Skirt originally has a side zip closure on the left and has a waistband facing all around. My plan was to eliminate the zipper and add a functional button placket down the centre front instead. I made no changes to the skirt back (cut 1 on the fold) or to the facings apart from cutting the front facing as 2 pieces rather than on the fold. As for the front skirt piece, I created a 3cm wide button placket and cut 2 pieces instead of 1 on the fold. I did this by shifting the centre front outwards by 5.5 cm – an additional 1.5cm for the left half of the button placket, then another 3cm for the placket facing and a last 1cm as the seam allowance for the placket to be folded over and top stitched down. The pattern piece looked like this (below) when I was through – pretty neat if I do say so myself! I also had lots of guidance using this very helpful tutorial. […]

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